IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

Rice is life

For people in rice cultures, rice mean just about everything
that is important:

birth, death, wealth, power, strength, fertility, virility, vitality..

...life itself.


*****

I found these thoughts displayed on one of the walls inside of IRRI’s Riceworld Museum during our recent visit with our friends from DTI-CITEM.

Indeed, RICE IS LIFE.

And whoever counters that thought needs to be exiled!

LOL. Well, it’s a half-joke.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
Look how golden this rice field?!

I am truly thankful for my team, for bringing me here. It was my first time to visit IRRI but I am quite familiar with what they do, thanks to my late father who always shares stories about his college years in Los Banos, and also his days in IRRI.

Am not sure if he did work here (I forgot the specific details) however, each time he’s telling me about it, I could always feel his pride with IRRI. My late father was an agriculturist, reasons why I learned some knowledge about gardening, farming and environment - things that wasn’t even taught us in public school (ironic isn’t it?).

Somehow, my tour at IRRI Riceworld Museum is quite emotional for me. It’s like I am visiting the museum with my father.


What is IRRI?
IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

Established in 1959, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) is an international agricultural research and training organization having Los Banos, Laguna as the headquarter conducting research on the rice plant and applied research on all phases of rice production, management, distribution and utilization. It aims to reduce poverty and hunger, improve the health of rice farmers and consumers, and ensure environmental sustainability of rice farming.

It was the first in the country and first in Asia, and the world, through the initiative of Rockefeller and Ford Foundation based in New York City. For over half the century, IRRI has provided a home to innovative scientists who had made it their lives’ work to reduce poverty through rice research. 
With having offices in seventeen (17) countries worldwide, IRRI is known for its work in developing rice varieties that contributed to the Green Revolution in the 1960s which pre-empted the famine in Asia.

IIRI is also the largest non-profit agricultural research centre in Asia.

You can check the complete history of IRRI through their website here.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
In 1994 the IRRI’s Riceworld Museum was opened its door to the public and welcomes many guests like farmers, dignitaries, scientists, tourists, students, and many others.

There is no fee in visiting the museum. Our team arrived almost noontime, and we enjoyed the tour with only our team as their guests!

(after 30minutes and so, the other guests arrive which I noticed are from the IRRI office in the next building).

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
Registration area during visit.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
In July 10, 1963 His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Her Majesty Queen Sirikit of Thailand visits IRRI.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

You see, rice is not that simple.

You will see these walls with many information all about rice – from the planting, to various varieties, origins etc.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
They also showcased the old-school tools and equipment on farming, including various baskets. I think many farmers are still using the equipment especially in rural areas with no budget to fund for modern machines.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
They also showcased the modern rice farming and processing equipment.

I always think that rice farming is more legit having carabao (aka water buffalo) pulling the farming carts!

But now, many farmers are using the modern processors and let Mr. Carabao do the work occasionally.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
These are the rice farming tools from various countries with rice cultures. Noticed how humbly stylish they are! IMHO that straw slippers hurts a lot even with socks on.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
This one is so huge I bet at least two carabao could pull this cart!

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
In Mountain Province, where rice farming is one of the main source of livelihood, the museum also includes this miniature traditional houses, and traditional dresses on the locals. You can also watch some video clips regarding Ifugao’s rice farming.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
This cart is from Chinese heritage.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour
Here you’ll see the list of donors from agencies and institutions from all over the world to help promote the rice culture worldwide.

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

IRRI Riceworld Museum Tour

After our tour, I learned to appreciate more the huge value of rice promotion.
Indeed, rice is life, and we must treasure that culture.

Philippines have many potential lands for rice farming. Let’s promote the rice culture so that we can minimize the importation of rice.

There is nothing wrong being a rice farmer. On the contrary, we must value them most. Without them, definitely poverty will rise up. They are heroes too!

Thank you for DTI-CITEM team for making this tour happen. You never know how much you made my childhood complete in visiting the Riceworld Museum. I felt that my late Dad’s story is now complete.


xoxo, Blair


IRRI (International of Rice Research Institute) Riceworld Museum
IRRI Headquarters
Los Banos Reseach Center,
Los Banos, Laguna Philippines
Email: info@irri.org
Telephone Nos. +632 580 5600 / +632 580 0606




26 LOVES AND COMMENTS:

  1. Rice is life!! LOL! i guess in away thats very true...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's still true hahaha I manage to control my rice intake but there are many times my spirit is begging for it.

      Delete
  2. We have had a national celebration, celebrating the farmers and fisherman coz they are the unsung heroes of the world.They should be celebrated for their contributions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. I heard they also have, but lack of awareness to the majority of the public. I do hope that will change.

      Delete
  3. Wahhh..so nice..yes indeed rice for life hahahah..but this is interesting information that everybody should know

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you dear! And glad you like rice as well.

      Delete
  4. cool! Never knew about this place before! One day must visit Philippines and have this in my travel journey

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That will be great. And its FREE ADMISSION :D

      Delete
  5. Amazing. I have never been to IRRI but my dad once worked there for a project for DA. I'm hoping I could visit sometime too

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh you should Francis! I visited the Museum and it was amazing. I do wish to come back and explore the whole IRRI.

      Delete
  6. Rice is big in Malaysia - I did not know that it is even bigger in the Philippines to have an international research centre. I guess we learn something new everyday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Emily! I am glad and thankful that my team brought me here.

      Delete
  7. Looks so fun! Will pay a visit when i off to Philippines!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Ashley! You will like the Philippines!

      Delete
  8. I've been to something similar in Sekinchan, malaysia.. very interesting!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Isaac! I assume you love rice as well :D

      Delete
  9. Nice...I have also visited a similar place back in Malaysia. Learning about rice farming is definitely informative :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's awesome! I hope I could visit the rice museum in Malaysia as well.

      Delete
  10. I love your outfit of the day! The museum looks really cool to visit as well =) Would love to visit it next time!

    ReplyDelete
  11. we have that here at our agro fair too and it sure was interesting to know what processes that our food went through

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. Planting and harvesting rice is not easy job. I learned a lot after our tour :D

      Delete
  12. Looks exciting but it's true. Rice is gold. Amen! Live long. What did you use to click the picks?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Alex,

      I'm using the Nikon D300 and smartphone Huawei P9.

      Delete
  13. Great museum. Nice that there's no fee. That way, many people can visit! must be nice to also learn more about modern rice farming and processing equipment. Interesting process! Love the rice faring tools as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Carola!

      I realized that the old tools in rice farming is quite similar even from other countries. It was very interesting to learn about the concept of from farm to table food.

      Delete

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