How Japanese Celebrates Entering Adulthood

Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day)


Hello Beautiful!


Did you know that in Japan, entering adulthood is being celebrated and has its own public holiday?


If you are going to visit Japan every January, take note of this public holiday!


Yes that's right. They called it Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day)  is a Japanese holiday celebrating young people’s graduation into adulthood which is held every second Monday of January (this year last 9th of January)


Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion


Every Japanese boy or girl who reaches the age of 20 (the legal age of majority in Japan) between April 2nd of the previous year and April 1st of the current year is invited to join ceremonies throughout Japan celebrating their transition from childhood to adulthood.


After a local government-organized morning or early afternoon Coming of Age ceremony with their family, new adults usually head out to party with their friends and celebrate their new freedom (and responsibility).


What a great way to celebrate your new freedom and privilege of adulthood: you are now legally drink, smoke, visit hostess bars and clubs, you can now gamble, and you can now legally drive!


Awesome right?!


Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion

Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion




For lovers of Japanese fashion, one of the best things about Coming of Age Day is that young women attending the official ceremonies throughout Japan traditionally wear formal furisode kimono along with beautifully done hair and makeup.


Young men occasionally wear kimono as well, although we more often see them in suits.


Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion

Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion

Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion




Kimonos are a relatively rare sight on the streets of Tokyo these days (with the exception of yukata during hanabi season).

Coming of Age Day is one of the only days of the year when you can walk around Harajuku and Shibuya and see large numbers of young people brightening up the streets in their colorful kimono.

It’s a wonderful thing to see – and something that is truly “only in Japan”!

Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion
 
Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day), kimono fashion





To all of the new adults who we met on the street in Shibuya: Congratulations, and we’re looking forward to the future that you all will create! Also, thank you for allowing us to take your pictures.

We hope to see you again soon!


How about you, how do you celebrate adulthood in your country?


xoxo, Blair




For more travel updates in Asia, follow me on Facebook.


94 LOVES AND COMMENTS:

  1. Great appreciation tradition in Japan.Here in Malaysia nobody cares whether you turn adult or not.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same here in the Philippines. Although yes we celebrate our 18th and 21th birthday, but we don't have a public holiday like in Japan.

      Delete
  2. Wow! Interesting.. Need to celebrate entering adulthood like this one? Good..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Kylie,

      Even you are over 20 years old, everyone is free to attend and join the crowd. However, only the Japanese ages 20years old will receive a gift from the government. So it's an amazing celebration.

      Delete
  3. This seems like so much fun! Probably similar to the Quinceanera that a lot of Latinas hold for their daughters.

    I wonder if I had a "growing up" event like this if I would feel more responsible or more like an adult. I just feel like I've never grown out of that kid I've always been! :) Haha

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Divya,

      You can always celebrate your adulthood anytime! But you might not get a legit public holiday :)

      Delete
  4. Wow I found my kimono which I'll wear next year in one of the pictures !!๐Ÿ’– I'm proud of this culture and I'm happy that you wrote about it!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Jelly,

      Oh please share us your photo wearing your new kimono very soon :)

      Delete
  5. This is really an interesting custom. I think the Malaysian age of adulthood is 21. But we don't have a ceremony to mark the special milestone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our is 21years old for male and 18years old for female, but no we don't have ceremonial event. Only our family cares, lol

      Delete
  6. How interesting! The kimonos are so pretty.

    In America, there really isn't a ceremony. Yes, there was Sweet Sixteen parties, but there really isn't any "you're an adult!" things. They turn 18 and are sort of pushed into the world, ha.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha yeah I agree. After the celebration, Mom will yell on your door saying "Wake up and don't be a lazy ass!" lol Mom's really a comedian :)

      Delete
  7. This is wonderful to see. The US does not have any special celebrations that I know of.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We only celebrate our birthday in the most simplest or grandest that we can imagine. But not like in japan where they celebrate it in a traditional and public ways.

      Delete
  8. Didn't know about this. I think it's good to celebrate a day of transition into adulthood like the Japanese.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. My Japanese friend tells me its like attending a graduation day! Parents are very enthusiast for the preparation of their clothes. Menswear are just tux or the kimono.. But for the ladies clothing are more expensive, rentals of kimono are not pure joke.

      Delete
  9. Wow never knew that this celebration actually exists! All of them look so pretty and the outfits are adorableee

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Eunice,

      Yeah and its a huge deal for them and for their families as well.

      Delete
  10. Always love Japnese fashion no matter modern wear or traditional wear. Really pretty <3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree Shini, it's like every clothing has its REAL PURPOSE not just to cover our naked bodies. It gives symbol on our personality and well-being.

      Delete
  11. Awh how nice. Didn't know the celebration was held that way but I do enjoy looking at all the fab kimono designs here. Cheers to the share dear :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you dear!

      It's one of their best day aside from their graduation. Now they can legally visit hostess bars and drink what they want without being kicked-out the bar, lol

      Delete
  12. This reminds me of my stay in Japan way back 2009. Haven't witnessed this occasion since I used to live in Ibaraki prefecture which is a 2-hr travel via bullet train going Tokyo. Such a fun event to attend.

    Mhaan | www.mommyrockininstyle.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, and not bad being an adult in Japan! I love their kimonos :)

      Delete
  13. wow.. this is amazing... so colourful and beautiful... wish I could be there to see it.. but am only heading to Osaka in March

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Meira,

      Maybe you can visit again next year! They celebrate it every 2nd Monday of January :)

      Delete
  14. Very interesting post! I learned a lot of new things about the Japanese culture.

    Beth || www.TheStyleBouquet.com

    ReplyDelete
  15. This is super cool. I wish America had a nice walk into adulthood ceremony. In America, 21 is the big age to do everything you named except we drive at 16. But, I am so intrigued to visit Japan during this type of ceremony in the future.


    Isaly Holland | http://www.memoriesbyisaly.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah and this celebration is also a huge deal for the families. Seeing their young kids in formal wear makes their heart leap with joy. Joy because they can get move out the house and work for their own living, haha

      Delete
  16. That's really interesting, I love learning new things about different cultures. Nikki x

    ReplyDelete
  17. I love the photos! All of the different outfits are so gorgeous.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So true, I feel like I would like to celebrate my adulthood too!

      Delete
  18. I love the way they dress. Simply gorgeous with their traditional outfits.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree Jane. I think that wearing traditional dresses for formal occasions helps us (at least) be grounded. We learned to appreciate our cultures thus, making other want to be like us too!

      Delete
  19. Wow! All so pretty with kimonos! I missed my chance to wear kimono during my Japan trip last year :( cheers, SiennyLovesDrawing

    ReplyDelete
  20. I love this time of the year in Japan, their lovely furisode, so pretty. Malaysians only celebrate it personally with family and friends.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah same here in the Philippines. But in Japan, it seems like being adult must be announce in an official way. Yes kind of formal but gives you that kind of privilege, or gaining respect to others.

      Delete
  21. Gorgeous, gorgeous photos and outfits! What a fun and unique holiday! I hope I can get to Japan one day -- this would be a fun time to visit, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Patricia,

      Am sure you will enjoy Japan like the most. Or maybe you might decide not to leave Japan :D

      Delete
  22. I'm obsessed with Japan because of my love for manga and anime! This is so amazing, a public holiday? Awesome!! I can't wait to visit Japan, truly, a top priority on my bucket list! ❤
    xoxo
    Radhika
    Expressing Life

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Radhika!

      Thank you for visiting. I will share more festival and holidays celebration in Japan :)

      Delete
  23. So interesting way of wearing and celebration. I like your tradition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love their kimonos. I don't care how expensive they are. I want to wear one!

      Delete
  24. this is interesting. all the JP girls look so kawaii!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So true! They really spend more effort and preparation for their announcement.

      Delete
  25. I've never thought that Japan celebrating that kind of event! It looks really fun for them and part of their culture.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Dana,

      Yeah that's what makes Japan unique. Every celebration should be announce official. It is how they show respect for their people.

      Delete
  26. Haha. I thought it would be 'something else'. I remember how when I was celebrating my 'adult', that I did nothing :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha... well did nothing too! In most Western countries they do crazy stuff (and some are things that you'll regret you are 20).

      Delete
  27. The kimonos are so pretty. I love that they celebrate this way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Their culture is so unique, which makes Japan an interesting place to travel and live in.

      Delete
  28. This is pretty cool. The celebration reminds me of Fashion Week. They're all dressed up looking fly as heck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha I agree. Cheers for their adulthood!

      Delete
  29. Wow that is such a great post, i love their kimonos and thanks for sharing this side of the story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is very interesting how they define RESPECT to each other. This is another way of giving respect to newly adults - they have their own holiday :)

      Delete
  30. Oh wow this is so neat- I had no idea! Love learning about differences in customs in other cultures.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Shane and thank you for visiting!

      Yes Japanese traditions and cultures are very unique :)

      Delete
  31. I've never heard of this holiday before, so thank you Blair, I'll sleep smarter tonight haha! The Japanese girls are so beautiful wearing their kimonos :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I want to wear kimono too! I don't care if its heavy hahaaha

      Delete
  32. The kimonos are so cool. I love this tradition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! How does the people in country celebrates adulthood?

      Delete
  33. What great pictures that you posted. I wasn't familiar with this day. Thank you for educating me. And is 29 the legal driving age there?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are welcome dear!

      The reach adulthood at the age of 20. And every year both male and female celebrate it traditionally and never fails.

      Delete
  34. Their fashion is so unique! It is so amazing to read about different cultures and beliefs!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That makes Japan one of the most interesting place to visit and to live-in. They value their tradition so much despite the modernization.

      Delete
  35. I aboslutely love learning about new cultures. This is so interesting and I'm so glad that I stumbled upon your blog!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Kimberly! Uberly appreciate it :)

      Delete
  36. I think that kimonos are beautiful and it is nice that youths have a day dedicated to their transition into adulthood. They should do something similar here! x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's like a graduation for being a youngster and makes them feel so important to the society. The Government is the host for this event, and they treat this celebration seriously :)

      Delete
  37. That sounds so great. I bet it would be something wonderful to actually see. My best friend is over in Japan now, she has been there a few weeks and is about to come home but the pictures she sent back so far have been beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Jessi!

      Yeah, it is also heartfelt to see these new adults every year happily celebrating their milestone in life. Both male and female are taking these seriously, even saving money for kimono rental, and to beautify themselves.

      Delete
  38. Those are very beautiful pictures you have here. And it's cool that you have a right of passage festival at 20. I am curious what the tradition is for it being that age as many other cultures have them only much earlier.

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    Replies
    1. It came from the early days of Japan. Being an adult is a responsibility, and should be taking seriously. Yeah be have birthdays and debuts, but in Japan it is different.

      Delete
  39. I absolutely LOVE Japanese culture! My two fave YouTubers, Simon and Martina, live in Japan and vlog all about these fun celebrations! (That's where I first heard of this one!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's cool! When you will visit Japan? Mark your calendar and catch this celebration next year!

      Delete
  40. Oh, very interesting tradition. I've never heard of anything like this before.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Crystal, and now you know! Visit Japan soon :D

      Delete
  41. These photos are beautiful, as are the brand new adults featured in them. I love the traditional kimono - I would so love the chance to be dressed up in one myself!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks awesome! I would like to wear kimono too!

      Delete
  42. I was not aware of this! I think it's awesome that there's a celebration like this for the kids! I'm pretty sure it's an exciting day for them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's right Elizabeth. It is like Graduation!

      Delete
  43. It's awesome to be able to celebrate this special day. I'm sure it's filled with excitement and fun! Their clothes are so lovely!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree.. and that kimonos are just rental, OMG its not cheap!

      Delete
  44. Oh wow, they look gorgeous. I'd love to wear a kimono, they've always been pretty to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. there are many kimono rentals in Japan that you can avail while you enjoy your walking tour around :)

      Delete
  45. This is really interesting.And it is nice to see young Japanese people in their traditional dresses.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Amila for visiting! Do browse my blog for more Japan travel guide.

      Delete
  46. How fun! This must be really cool to see!

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    Replies
    1. Not only cool Cameron, it is also educational :)

      Delete
  47. What a neat event - the perfect way to celebrate, too! We don't do anything cool like that in the United States :( Scowl boo hiss :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That makes Japan so unique! Thanks for visiting Kristen :)

      Delete

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