Visiting the Greek Gods, Goddesses, and the Heroes at the Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
What comes into your mind when you heard about Greece?



Probably gorgeous vistas? Alfresco café and restaurants? One of the fantastic summer escapades? Or maybe you thought about Mamma Mia, plus singing, dancing plus dining including that moment when you dream of having a local Greek fling.

As part of our weekly spontaneous Melbourne tour, we decided to visit this remarkable museum right in the heart of the CBD, near the famous Flagstaff Garden. It is hard not to notice this outstanding building, one of the famous landmarks in Melbourne (since 1872) along William Street, which is also known as the former Royal Mint.





About the building

The former Royal Mint stands on the land of the peoples of the Kulin Nation.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The gleaming coat of arms, Renaissance Revival architecture and imposing brick wall of the Former Royal Mint are familiar to many Melbournians.

Today, the main building is home to the Hellenic Museum and a series of offices for commercial businesses. The northern guardhouse is now a bar and restaurant and the southern guardhouse is the base for Working Heritage. The Mint Car Park at the rear of the site is a public car park that funds our activities.




Inside the Hellenic Museum

The Hellenic Museum is Australia’s finest museum that is inaugurated in April 2007. Since its inception, the Hellenic Museum has continued to build and maintain its collections. Today, hundreds of objects spanning over 8,000 years of Hellenic history are on view at any given time in the Museum's galleries.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

This year 2020, The Hellenic Museum is celebrating its 13th year of continuous bringing together multiple artistic disciplines, historical objects, perspectives that aim to present a holistic experience of Greece, Greek culture, many contributions, and continue to make to contemporary society.

Founded by the late Melbourne businessman and philanthropist Spiros Stamoulis, who emigrated from Greece to Australia back in the 1950s when he was 12-years old.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The museum consists of two floors, and currently hosting five (5) exhibitions: Heroes & Hoplites (Warfare in Ancient Greece); Sam Jinkes The Messenger; Oneiroi; Beyond Attica, Art of Magna Graecia; and Gods Myths & Mortals.




Exhibitions: Heroes & Hoplites – Warfare in Ancient Greece

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
What is the famous warfare you know from Greece?

If you have seen the movie of Troy, Hercules, Alexander the Great, or the 300 Spartans; then you have a glimpse of what Greek warfare is about.

In the ancient Greek world, warfare was seen as a necessary evil of the human condition. Whether it be small frontier skirmishes between neighboring city-states, lengthy city-sieges, civil wars, or large-scale battles between multi-alliance blocks on land and sea, the vast rewards of war could outweigh the costs in material and lives. Whilst there were long periods of peace and many examples of friendly alliances, the powerful motives of territorial expansion, war booty, revenge, honor, and the defense of liberty ensured that throughout the Archaic and Classical periods the Greeks were regularly engaged in warfare both at home and abroad. 

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The Hoplite Phalanx
The mainstay of any Greek army was the hoplite. His full panoply was a long spear, short sword, and circular bronze shield and he was further protected, if he could afford it, by a bronze helmet (with inner padding for comfort), bronze breastplate, greaves for the legs and finally, ankle guards. Fighting was at close-quarters, bloody, and lethal. This type of warfare was the perfect opportunity for the Greek warrior to display his manliness (andreia) and excellence (aretē) and generals led from the front and by example.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
To provide greater mobility in battle the hoplite came to wear lighter armor such as a leather or laminated linen corselet (spolades) and an open-faced helmet (pilos). The peltast warrior, armed with short javelins and more lightly-armored than the hoplite became a mobile and dangerous threat to the slower moving hoplites. Other lighter-armed troops (psiloi) also came to challenge the hoplite dominance of the battlefield. Javelin throwers (akonistai), archers (toxotoi), and slingers (sphendonētai) using stones and lead bullets could harry the enemy with attacks and retreats. Cavalry (hippeis) was also deployed but due to the high costs and difficult terrain of Greece, only in limited numbers e.g., Athens, possessing the largest cavalry force during the Peloponnesian Wars had only 1,000 mounted troops. Decisive and devastating cavalry offensives would have to wait until the Macedonians led by Philip and Alexander in the mid-4th century BCE.




Exhibition: Beyond Attica – Art of Magna Graecia

This exhibition showcases an exceptional collection of vase-wear from early Athenian black-figure to later Apulian, Campanian, and Lucanian red-figure vessels from south Italy.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
Until the fifth century, BCE South Italian settlements imported their pottery from Corinth and Athens. By the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404 BCE, Athenian pot production and trade had declined and cities in southern Italy began to manufacture pottery locally. The five regions in South Italy: Lucania, Apulia, Campania, Paestum, and Sicily produced significant amounts of pottery between 440 and 300 BCE. While these areas were both politically independent and culturally unique regions of the Greek world, they nevertheless drew influence from Athenian pottery shape, design, and iconography.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
Working with these Attic models, South Italian painters and potters developed their own styles and shapes- distinguishing them from their counterparts in mainland Greece. A distinct preference for added color especially white, yellow, and red, is characteristic of South Italian vases in the fourth century BCE and attests to the artistic and cultural richness of Greek-speaking settlements.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
This exhibition presents a selection of pots ranging from early Athenian black-figure to later Apulian, Campanian, and Lucian red-figure pottery. On loan from the Koumantatakis Family, these vessels are arranged according to style and theme. This collection is significant in its scope of style and regional variations; providing the viewer with a comparative and broad selection of ancient Greek pot production, not limited to a single time period or region.





Exhibitions: Gods Myths & Mortals – Greek Treasures Across the Millenia

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
If you have one opportunity to be an immortal god, who doy ou want to be?

I reckon that I would be like a goddess, with a combination powers of Aphrodite, Athena, and of course Zeus. Playing lots of time with the RPG game called Age of Mythology gives me a lot of feels about this museum and exhibits.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
Some people believe that the statue of Aristodikos is the most beautiful Kouros statue of all. It is currently on display at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens (this statue in the Hellenic Museum is the replica). Archaeologist Christos Karouzos, Director of the Museum (1942-1964), examined it and estimated that he must have died at the age of 25, around 500 BC. His relatives asked that his sculpted form be carved on precious marble from Paros, ideal for sculpting human bodies. They mounted it on the grave beside the road, as was the custom, outside their estate in Foinikia, in what is now the municipal unit of Kalyvia. However, twenty years later, they laid the statue over the buried body and covered it with dirt. They wanted to save the memorial statue from the Persians that would burn Attica to ashes. Twenty-five centuries later, the statue emerged from the earth, almost intact and protected. In 1944, the landowner sent workers to plow his field. The plow bumped into stone; the same stone again and again. They grabbed hoes to dig it out, but they unearthed Aristodikos instead. The core was intact; only the arms were missing, and the legs broke. The worst of the smaller wounds were the deformed eyes, lips, and nose, due to years of plowing over the face. They loaded the statue on a carriage, covered it with hay, and took it to the Museum adventurously, but in secrecy. In the empty Museum, all statues had already been sleeping buried in the ground, beneath the floor, for days before the Germans invaded Athens. Anyone who visits the Museum today will see the figure of Aristodikos standing out in the Kouros room; first among equals.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The statue is known as a Diadoumenos ( aka the Diadem Wearer) a youth tying a fillet around his head after a victory in an athletic contest. It is a later Roman copy of a bronze original dated between 450-425 BCE. The original bronze may have stood ins sanctuary such as that at Olympic or Dephi, where games were regularly held. Based on ancient literary accounts, there were over forty known copies of this statue. This attests to the original bronze being one of the most highly esteemed creations of Polykleitos, the renowned Greek sculptor from Argos.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
Death of Clytemnestra, the story begins with King Agamemnon of Mynacae, frustrated by poor winds as he tries to set sail for war with Troy, persuades his wife, Clytemnestra, to send their daughter Iphigenia to him. He does so under the pretense that she will marry Achilles, but instead, the girl is sacrificed to Artemis for the sake of fair winds and success in the coming war. Betrayed, Clytemnestra takes revenge by murdering Agamemnon upon his return to Mycenae. Blood crimes were considered the most heinous of crime in ancient Greece and demanded swift retribution, thus Clytemnestra was murdered by her son Orestes.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The image carved on this stele is a motif known as The Thracian Horsemen, which was popular during both the Hellenistic and Roman periods. The inscription inscribed both above and below the hunt scene reads For Jupiter Sabazius by a soldier of the Second Praetorian Cohort, a century of Mercator, whose name is Valerius Aulusanus.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
Vulcan was the Roman god of fire whose worship dates back to the archaic kings of Rome, making him one of the oldest, primary Roman gods. He is depicted in typical style on this relief: a middle-aged, bearded man, holding a double-headed axe in his left hand. Following the Roman victory over Greece, many ancient Greek gods were merged with the existing Roman ones, combining their characteristics. Vulcan’s Greek counterpart was Hephaestus, the god of fire and patron of craftsmen and metalwork.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
Dating to between 480-300 BCE this bronze statue is representative of the most powerful of the Olympian gods, Zeus. The statue is so named because it was found in two pieces in the sea off the Cape of Artemision in the 1920s. The god is depicted with legs widespread, the left arm outstretched, and the right drawn back in preparation to loose a thunderbolt. There has been some suggestion amongst historians that the statue may represent Poseidon, in which case he would be holding his trident.




If you've been watching many historical Greek movies, you will notice how intricate their dresses are!

Bridal Dress (in Ionina Islands, Corfu)

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The bridal dress of Corfu became a festive dress to be worn after marriage. It comprised a white chemise, heavily pleated underskirt, an overskirt, and a breast cloth, which covered the chest. The apron, made of silk or tulle, was covered with intricate and colorful applique which was secured with a broad velvet and gold embroidered belt. The bodice and outer jacket, also of velvet, was similarly embroidered. An abundance of gold jewelry worn on the chest and ears gives clear evidence of Corfu's historical associations with Italy. Other indications of this are the headgears with its red ribbons wound around black silk padding, often adorned with real or artificial flowers and other ornaments.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

 We’ve also checked some religious relics from ancient Greek religion, including all the early priests' clothes, old bibles, and other items.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
 Part of the early Greek priests’ clothes.





History of Ancient Greek Jewelry

Even before the arrival of metallurgy to Greece and surrounding areas, these territories produced a constant stream of simple stone, clay, and bone decoration items. After the arrival of the Bronze Age, Greeks began creating more and more complicated designs eventually producing jewelry that reflected the wealth and power of nobility and rulers. 

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
Jewelry in ancient Greece was viewed as a symbol of power, social status, ward against evil, celebration of the gods, and was most often used by female members of the wealthy class. Even though they received techniques for making gold items from the nearby kingdoms of Egypt and Mesopotamia around 3 thousand years ago, they managed to retain their unique style that remained unchanged in the centuries that followed.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The development of the great Greek Mycenaean civilization brought the first great rise in jewelry use. Gold became primary decorative raw material, although silver, lead, bronze, and various alloys were also used. Carefully crafted rings, necklaces, and pendants were some of the most known jewelry types from that period. Sadly the fall of the Mycenaean civilization brought three hundred years of "dark ages" where culture, technology, and entire Greek society almost collapsed. This period finally ended with the coming of the Golden Age of Greece when their culture blossomed and enabled the advancement of jewel making technology to the next level. Use of molds and thin leaves of gold enabled Greeks to manufacture some of the most beautiful pieces of antique jewelry that are preserved today, and regarded as the masterpieces of the highest order. The most popular gemstones were amethysts, pearls, chalcedony, cornelian, garnet, and emeralds.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
Hellenic period and the arrival of Alexander the Great brought an influx of gold, precious gems, and oriental influences to Greece, but the fall of Greece under the control of the Roman Empire in the 2nd century BC brought many drastic changes to their style of jewelry making. Influences of Christianity and the formation of the Byzantine Empire enabled the renaissance of their style, spreading of high-quality jewelry and great regard toward the skilled jewelers. Sadly even those styles reached its end after conquering of Greece by Turkey, and eventual independence gained in 1827. By then, clashes of styles that raged in their culture brought the destruction of many ancient works of art that were melted and modified to look more in line with the new modern European style.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
 Gold wreaths that imitate natural ones come mainly from royal tombs of Macedonia, Asia Minor, and southern Italy. The crowning of the dead with a wreath signified that they were worthy of being rewarded with eternal life after death. The preference for a particular plant species was presumably related to the deity worshipped by the family of the deceased. Wreaths of myrtle are associated with Aphrodite, Demeter, and Persephone.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
 Ancient Greek coins all are on loan from the Peter & Mary Mitrakas Collection





Exhibition: ONEIROI – Photographic Installation by Bill Henson

The Museum’s photographic installation Oneiroi, is a unique collaboration between the Hellenic Museum, Benaki Museum, Athen and artists, Bill Henson.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
The contemporary works incorporate five historical objects from the Benaki Museum collection, on display in the exhibition Gods, Myths & MOtrals; including a 3500-year old gold cup, an Ottoman period necklace, and the knife which once belonged to a revolutionary leader. The objects reflect the rich and varied nature of Greek history and the ways in which Greece has evolved through the ages.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
Despite spanning millennia, the Benaki treasures included within each of the portraits still appear breathtakingly modern. They are unique pieces individually created by artists and craftspeople whose aesthetics and skill are a testament to a culture's dedication to design innovation.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
Henson’s technical and aesthetic approach to his work, his structure, composition, and his use of light and shadow adds an ethereal quality to the works. His invocation of the Oneiroi, the spirits of dreams, as elusive as the shadows of memory which make up the past, transform the objects from static artifacts, to objects alive with purpose.





Exhibition: The Messenger by Sam Jinks

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
IRIS – The Messenger Goddess

In collaboration with the Victorian Government,  the Hellenic Museum has commissioned an exciting new work by Australian artist Sam Jinks. Inspired by a fragment from the Parthenon, the Messenger is a work unlike any other.

The Messenger, a spectacular new work by internationally lauded artist Sam Jinks. The sculpture is inspired by a statue of the Greek goddess Iris from the west pediment of the Parthenon (now in the British Museum).

Sam Jinks' commission was made possible by the support of the Victorian Government and philanthropists Peter and Mary Mitrakas. It was produced as part of a cross-cultural partnership between the Hellenic Museum and the Benaki Museum, Athens.

Sculptor Sam Jinks’ inspiration for his new work is the statue of the goddess Iris which once graced the west pediment of the Parthenon. Iris was the swift messenger goddess with the ability to communicate between the gods and mortals; moving beyond the realm of the living and freely into the Underworld.

Iris, a goddess of liminal spaces, is for Jinks a metaphor for the way we can view the Parthenon sculptures. While we are separated by the creators of the Parthenon by over 2400 years, by focusing on the details- the contours of the marble, the subtle movements of the sculptor, the gentle care taken in forming the bodies, and the resistance of the tools over the marble surface, the divide between the contemporary and the ancient recedes. In this way, we can attempt to decode the meaning and sentiment left behind by ancient sculptors for whom the works were a testament to the power and magnificence of the gods. By creating a work with its roots in classical sculpture and mythology Jinks seeks to connect with an ancient tradition while guided by contemporary sensibilities and using the tools available to a sculptor today.

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

Admission Fee

Entry Fee and Access to all exhibitions:

Adult AUD$10.00
*Concession - AUD$5.00 (Students, Seniors, Pensioners, Health Care Card)

Due to Covid-19, the Hellenic Museum is currently temporarily closed until further notice
For all inquiries contact (03) 8615 9016 / Email: info@hellenic.org.au


The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne

The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne
I am truly glad that we’ve visited the Hellenic Museum. It was an amazing experience for both of us, and we learned more about the Hellenic culture. After this tour, we promised each other that one day we will visit Greece and explore more his Greek side.

For now, I am happy that my boyfriend got his own Greek blood (*wink, wink)



The Hellenic Museum
280 William Street, Melbourne
Victoria, 3000 Australia

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162 comments :

  1. WOW all of that is gorgeous!! the pottery is always my favorite to see - it's so pretty!!

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    1. Thank you Ashli! I always wonder the early ways of doing pottery that could lasts thousands of years.

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  2. I am so jealous I wish I could go, that exhibit looks amazing. Nothing like this comes to my local area.

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    1. Thanks for diligently scrolling the Google Map, and I found this place. It was unexpected.

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  3. I love the architecture, with the imposing buildings and nice interiors; and the collection and history are interesting. Was a good read, thank you.

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  4. This looks like such a nice experience! Thanks for sharing it with us!

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  5. The hellenic museum looks absolutely beautiful with amazing work of art. Thanks for sharing this with us.

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    1. You are always welcome, Mary! Thank you for visiting :)

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  6. I remember the building so I can only assume it was the mint when I was there. Had it been the Hellenic Museum I would definitely paid a visit. Your photos are wonderful. Informative post, thanks for sharing.

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    1. Yes, they turn it into a museum. Hope you can visit soon!

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  7. What a beautiful exhibit. I especially like the jewelry

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  8. What a great collection! There's such a wide variety of objects.

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    1. Thank you Tracy! Hope you can visit this museum soon!

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  9. I loved this place when I visited there. These pics brought back memories. A great place to spend a few hours for a small entry fee. The exhibits and the artifacts are amazing. If you get hungry or thirsty, there a cafe on site.

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    1. Yes, there is a café. However, it was closed when we visited.

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  10. Wow what a detailed tour of the museum!

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  11. I started to get fond of Greek Mythology since I was in high school. The stories behind every Gods and Goddesses for both Roman and Hr

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  12. I started to become fond of Greek Mythology since I was in high school. It's really interesting once you get to know the stories behind every greek gods and goddesses for both Roman and Greek. I wish I could be able to visit a museum inspired like this one. It's truly a work of art!

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    1. Now I am excited to visit the main Greek Museum in Greece per se!

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  13. amazing photos! what camera was used here, thanks for sharing and maybe we stop by here when we get to melbourne

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    1. Thank you for visiting , Kenneth! I used my Samsung S10+ for my photos and videos.

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  14. What comes into your mind when you heard about Greece? gods and goddesses 😅 ang gaganda ng mga kuha mo feeling ko kasama din ako sa tour mo. Feeling ko magugustuhan ng friend ko dyan, sabihin ko sa kanya baka sakali gusto niya pumunta kapag nag open na ulit ang Museum.

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    1. Thank you Calai! Sino ang bet mong immortal God?

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  15. I have a lowkey admiration w/ anything related to Greece, its people and history kaya I always wanted to visit Europe because of its beautiful building structures na parang nasa ancient greek times. Saka the sculptures of the Gods and Goddesses are what I also love kasi I find them very aesthetically pleasing. Oh, that jewelries in ancient Greece are stunning! Nakakamiss tuloy bumisita ng mga museum ♡♡♡

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    1. What I love about museum is that you can stare at all items for longer time and no one will judge you.

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  16. I love visiting museums and have been missing going to one lately. Thanks for this read!

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    1. Hope this pandemic will be over so that all of us can travel with less restrictions anymore.

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  17. What a beautiful museum! I love learning about places like this.

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  18. Lovely photos. Very informative post as well. Made me miss travelling.

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    1. you will be travelling soon, Anne. Let's all be have patience :)

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  19. Didn't know that there's a museum in Melbourne that features Greek Gods and Goddesses! Thanks for taking us to a virtual tour with your photos. Ang gaganda!

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    1. Yes it was a great museum! I will visit the rest of Melbourne's finest museum and more virtual tour!

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  20. This would be another "heaven" destination for me, since I learned to love Greek mythology during my high school years. I remembered spending hours in the library skimming on Greek mythology books. I wish I could visit Melbourne in the future.

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    1. Same! Kahit luma na yung books, maganda pa rin basahin! I even downloaded the old PRG game Age of Mythology coz I love their stories :)

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  21. Really enjoyed my read from your sharing as I love to explore museum whenever am in a new country during my travels. Am adding this to my to travel list. cheers, siennylovesdrawing

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  22. Super ganda ng article! Fanatic ako ng mga ganito: ancient things,kingdom etc. Happy to re-read and search more about it :)

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  23. Thank you for this virtual tour of the Hellenic Museum! This makes me very happy! I'm a huge history buff and I always make sure to visit places that are reach in history & culture. I can't help but gawk at those jewelries!

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    1. Those jewelries are superb! The designs are very intricate and unique.

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  24. So thankful here that you share this informative and historic story. it only shows how well off the country is

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    1. That is true! Sobrang yaman pla ng Greece thousands of years ago. Pero ngayon, Greece is one of the poorest country in Europe.

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  25. Wow, i always loved greek mythology!! I find it fascinating and i feel like i would enjoy going around and around that museum. Thank you for sharing the and the stories behind them. I loved seeing them and learned so much!!

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  26. Amazing building with sturning interior design. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Thank you for appreciating my blog, and story time!

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  27. Thanks for taking me to Greek era haha. If will be an immortal God I will definitely Poseidon whom is the god of the sea and protector of all aquatic features. Highly because I am fond of taking care of sea creatures and the sea itself. I hope you really had fun visiting this place.

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    1. Poseidon is one of the best, and hottest God! You got a great choice :)

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  28. aww merong palang gantong museum! i remember loving greek metholody in highschool! im sure ill love this as well!

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    1. Maliit pa itong museum! Mas Malaki yung nasa Greece which I am more excited to visit in the future!

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  29. The amount of history and time put into this is astonishing! These pictures provided lots of insight to your visit that was helpful to follow along.

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    1. Very thankful for generous donors, and rich families who loaned their collection to the museum.

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  30. Just looking through this museum, wakes the inner thrills inside of me. I love vintage items and seeing those greek jewelries excites me more! I just have to see those vase face to face.

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  31. Such an impressive museum to visit. I love how detailed the stairs is. and those vases looks really great by its art.

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    1. I am surprised that this museum is right in the middle of Melbourne! Amazing destination :)

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  32. I was fond of Greek gods nung highschool ako. Ang ganda sa ang pang feed ng curiosity etong museum sa mga gustong matutunan ang all about Greek Mythology.

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    1. I agree! I love watching tv series and movies of any Greek and Roman mythology.

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  33. Amazing how they preserved all of those things. I won't miss this pag nakabalik ako sa Melbourne in the future. Grabe yung, 'The Messenger', it looks real in your photo.

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    1. Ohh that statue looks super real! Kulang na lang eh mahawakan ko to see if its real or not. Ang galing ng artist.

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  34. Ang gaganda ng mga collection nila. Ang tagal ko nakastare dun sa picture ng stair! nakakamesmerize kahit yung mismong place lang, what more kung makita ko pa in personal mga collections nila

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  35. what a beautiful staircase! my son would love to be in this museum. there was a time when he was into gods and goddesses.

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  36. Love the grand staircase! looks opulent and elegant. Which part of the museum did you like the most?

    Looks interesting specially with the bits of info you shared there :)

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    1. I like the Gods Myth & Mortals exhibition, then The Messenger. Those jewelries are also spectacular!

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  37. Cool-looking building! I just learned what Hellenic meant a few years ago.

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  38. Both the interior and the collections are very impressive. Thanks for the tip.

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  39. Kristine Nicole AlessandraJuly 13, 2020 at 12:46 PM

    That is a really fantastic museum. I am really amazed at the artifacts on display. The ancient Greeks were very good craftsmen! I wish I could visit the Hellenic Museum too.

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    1. I agree. The early Greeks are very creative and artistic. They have very rich and old culture.

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  40. This is every mythology lovers' dream! My mom would love visiting this place. Hoping I can take her here in the future.

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  41. The place is looking pretty neat! man, I would be excited to be here remembering all the movies I watched hehe

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  42. What a beautiful building. I love old buildings, they have so much more personality than modern buildings do now.

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    1. I agree. Knowing that this was a mint building, it gives more amazing character.

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  43. This looks like a neat museum. I'll have to get here one day. I always love learning more about cultures.

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    1. Thank for visiting! I'm sure you will enjoy every exhibitions.

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  44. looks like a great experience! I love reading about ancient and pagan believes, it is always very enriching

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    1. I learned so much from this place. It would be more thrilling to visit the biggest Greek Museum in Greece.

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  45. This is amazing, I have always wanted to go to Greece. The museum is beautiful and the staircase breathtaking.

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    1. When you want to visit Greece but you are in Australia, then visiting the Hellenic Museum in Melbourne is a good alternative.

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  46. Wow! Those are really interesting artifacts and the history behind them is quite fascinating.

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  47. Amazing! I was a classics major in undergrad and boy was this nice to see. I think the gold wreath was the most beautiful thing in there, though I also liked the Diadem Wearer.

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    1. I agree, that gold wreath is divine! Fit for the Gods!

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  48. wow this looks like huge place to spend the day! I admit I can just get lost for days in museums. I loved going to London and going to all the museums. We stayed near the V&A museum and I went multiple times and never saw everything. You guys would love London!

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    1. Aww that is amazing! Visiting London is my dream as well :)

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  49. That is beautiful! I would love to tour this museum.

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  50. What amazing statues and art. I love that elaborate staircase with the detailing. Hellenic history is so interesting.

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  51. WOW this looks amazing!! We love to visit museums and learn about history so this all looks very cool and like a fab day out x

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  52. This reminds me of my trip to Athens a few years ago and there was so much to see and do. I did enjoy all the greek salads although I did not taste all 365 of them.

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    1. That is still wonderful! I wish to visit Athens and other Greece old cities.

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  53. This hellenic museum sounds quite amazing and very interesting one to visit and explore..loved the every look and every of art and everything..glad you shared this with us...Thanks indeed for sharing...

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    1. I'm happy that you guys like my Hellenic blog :)

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  54. I miss going to museums! This looks like an amazing day out in Melbourne.

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  55. There's so many beautiful things to love and learn about this place. I love the facade the structure and everything in it.

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  56. This looks like such an amazing place to visit!! SO much history. and so beautiful.

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  57. Oh wow, this is so very impressive. I love, love it, thanks for sharing

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  58. It looks like my son will love this museum! Especially now that we've been reading books about Greek Gods and Goddesses.
    .

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    1. That is great! Who is his favorite mythical character?

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  59. This place looks amazing! I am going to go online and see what virtual tours they have. My kids learn about much of this in elementary school and then middle school because much of Western culture finds it roots in Hellenic history. I think they will enjoy seeing the reinforcement of what they have learned.

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    1. Virtual tour is currently available now that the museum is temporarily closed. Hope when everything are same, this museum will open again to welcome guests.

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  60. Your visit to the Greek museum got me back to my tour of similar sections in Europe and UK. I loved the whole section where you describe the armor. Could not help comparing that to what they wore in India. The ancient bibles and jewelry was fun to see too. Thanks for sharing this

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    1. The Greeks artifacts are very unique! Ohh all I could do it absorbed them and enjoy the exhibit.

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  61. Oh wow! That museum is so beautiful. I've never seen one quite like this before. It has such an intimate feel to it. I'd love to go there and explore.

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    1. Now my next agenda is to visit the biggest Greek Museum in Greece!

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  62. This sounds like an amazing place to explore. So many great pieces and so much awesome history!

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    1. I am glad that I visited this museum before lockdown happened.

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  63. Greek and Roman history are my ALL TIME FAVORITES!!

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    1. Same here! I can't wait that new Greek Mythology inspired series be released on Netflix!

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  64. That is definitely my kind of museum. I love greek history.

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  65. i remember going to my local museum to see the Greek collection as it related to my studies. that's awesome you can go to this exhibit. sounds like a great one.

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  66. I actually visited Hellenic Museum 2 years ago. It was one of my favorite places in Melbourne!

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  67. Wow...where do I even start from? Greece is centuries full of stories and tales. Thank you for sharing some starting-points.

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    1. I am happy that you did enjoy my blog about the Hellenic Museum!

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  68. So great to be able to explore Greek history in the museum so close to home in Melbourne. I always find it interesting to look at art and design from those periods in time. It gives you such an insight into life at that time. I love to learn more about the Greek gods and goddesses. And cool that the Goddess Iris was recreated by a local artist.

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  69. The Hellenic Museum looks to be jam packed full of things to see. I like the grand staircase as well as the Exhibition of The Messenger. That must have been awesome.

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    1. Thank you Adele! It was a very memorable experience :)

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  70. I have always been intrigued by Greek and Roman history...and you're right Greece does remind me a bit of Mamma Mia now! The Hellenic museum seems impressive with so many artifacts. The Iris exhbit is just stunning.

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    1. Visiting museums are the closest thing to visit the actual place. Greece can wait, for the time being.

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  71. I did not know that in Australia, you can admire Hellenic art. It is so intriguing. I would like to see Melbourne someday so that I will add the museum to my list. It has an exciting and vibrant art collection. Ancient Greek Jewelry looks fantastic. I like the Exhibition The Messenger by Sam Jinks. Amazing sculpture!

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    1. Australia has almost 7% Greek immigrants and is one of the strongest, and tight-knit communities in the country. Through the generous efforts of wealthy and generous Greek families, the Hellenic Museum was built and now one of the most visited museums in Melbourne.

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  72. Wow what a beautiful building! I love things that relate back to greece they always seem to have such beautiful amazing stories. The bridal dresses looks stunning! Ancient jewellery is also something I always look for when visiting museums as i find it so fascinating!

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  73. I have always been fascinated with Greek Mythology and it is just wonderful. I would definitely love to visit if given a chance. It would be interesting to see the warfare artifacts.

    To answer your question, I would love to be Athena. :)

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  74. I had no idea there was a museum of Greek history in Australia, such a long way from home ;) Interesting that it was founded by a Greek immigrant as a way to celebrate and honor his culture. Although I'm not a huge fan of archeological museums (how many clay vases can a person see?), as a teenager, I was obsessed with mythology, especially the Greek gods. It's a fascinating culture and history. I figure I would have been Artemis, wild and free.

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    1. Thank you for visiting! I am sure you will be enjoying your life just like Artemis :)

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  75. I'll admit I don't know much about Greece except some mythology and that they had cool looking armor back in ancient times. Thankfully, your post both of those parts for me. I now know the foot soldier of the Greek army was the hoplite. Those were some interesting backstories of the Gods depicted - lots of murders, wars, and carnage involved, I can tell. They look completely human-like, not as abstract or divine as I thought. Everything else - pottery, jewelry looked great and that "crowning of the dead" wreath was an interesting concept. Very informative museum trip - you certainly know your way through Greek history.

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    1. Aww thank you Ran! I still know few information, which I am eager to learn more :)

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  76. I was in Melbourne for a few days last year and remember seeing this building from the outside in CBD but did not walk in, mostly because I am not a museum person. I am intrigued, however, to know that there's a Greek museum in Melbourne! They also seem to have quite the collection of artefacts.

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    1. Yeah, you should have visited! An AUD$10 entrance fee is totally worth it :)

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  77. I'm a diehard fan of Greek gods and godesses and now I am super inggit. I want to see these museum, too. Hopefully soon!

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  78. Isnt this magical. I would love to visit this museum!

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  79. My favorite movie when i was a kid was Gladiator staring Russel Crowe. The armors and helmets reminds me of the film. Hope to visit the Hellenic Museum one day

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    1. Wow I agree! Russel Crowe did well in that movie :)

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  80. Hellenic Museum is going to my must-see list in Melbourne. I am intrigued at the jewelries, especially the golden wreaths. It was a treat to my eyes going through the Greek culture and heritage.

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    1. For just Aud$10 entrance fee you can enjoy its beauty for hours.

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  81. This museum looks fantastic! I've been to Athens last winter and visited all those sites and I must really say that this museum looks as nice as the archeological museum in Athens. Also, your pictures are doing it justice and are taken from interesting angles.

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    1. awww thank you! Athens is still in my wish list!

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