Ladies Guide on Wine Lingo

Ladies Guide on Wine Lingo #forurbanwomen

Everyone drinks wine for a different reason.

Wine is a good basic everyday drink. A glass with lunch or dinner adds a nice touch, and you don’t have to save it for any special occasion. It provides an enjoyable chance of pace from the beverages that we usually have with food.

Wine is one of the most elegant of human creations. It is unparalleled in enhancing the enjoyment of a fine meal, imparting a spirit or refinement to any occasion, and offering a complexity of character that is unlike that available from any other beverage.

And of course, I drink and love wine because it is good to my health and makes me relax and ease my stress, and helps me to have a lovely sweet dreams.

Check out our guide to the most important words to know when purchasing wine or speaking about it with the sommelier.

Aggressive - A wine with harsh and pronounced flavors. The opposite of a wine described as “smooth” or “soft”.

Aroma - The smell of a wine. The term is generally applied to younger wines, while the term bouquet is reserved for more aged wines.

Austere - A wine that is dominated by harsh acidity or tannin and is lacking the fruit needed to balance those components.

Body - The sense of alcohol in the wine and the sense of feeling in the mouth.

Ladies Guide on Wine Lingo #forurbanwomen

Buttery - A wine that has gone through malolactic fermentation and has a rich, creamy mouth feel with flavors reminiscent of butter.

Cassis - The French term for the flavors associated with black currant. In wine tasting, the use of cassis over black currant typically denotes a more concentrated, richer flavor.

Cedar wood - A collective term used to describe the woodsy aroma of a wine that has been treated with oak.

Chocolaty - A term most often used of rich red wines such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot noir that describes the flavors and mouth feel associated with chocolate--typically dark.

Closed - A wine that is not very aromatic.

Depth - A term used to denote a wine with several layers of flavor. An aspect of complexity.

Earthy - A wine with aromas and flavor reminiscent of earth, such as forest floor or mushrooms. It can also refer to the drying impression felt on the palate caused by high levels of geosmin that occur naturally in grapes.

Fat - A wine that is full in body and has a sense of viscosity.

Finish - The sense and perception of the wine after swallowing.

Jammy - A wine that is rich in fruit but maybe lacking in tannins.

Leathery - A red wine high in tannins, with a thick and soft taste.

Legs - The tracks of liquid that cling to the sides of a glass after the contents have been swirled. Often said to be related to the alcohol or glycerol content of a wine. Also called tears.

Meaty - A wine with a rich, full body that gives the drinker the impression of being able to “chew” it.

Midpalate - A tasting term for the feel and taste of a wine when held in the mouth.

Musky - Can be used in both a positive and negative connotation relating to the earthy musk aroma in the wine. Typically positive in relation to wines from the Muscat grape family.

Nose
- A tasting term for the aroma, smell or bouquet of a wine.

Ladies Guide on Wine Lingo #forurbanwomen

Oaky - A wine with a noticeable perception of the effects of oak. This can include the sense of vanilla, sweet spices like nutmeg, a creamy body and a smoky or toasted flavor.

Palate - A tasting term for the feel and taste of a wine in the mouth.

Polished - A wine that is very smooth to drink, with no roughness in texture and mouth-feel. It is also well balanced.

Short - A wine with well develop aromas and mouth-feel but has a finish that is little to non-existent due to the fruit quickly disappearing after swallowing.

Spicy - A wine with aromas and flavors reminiscent of various spices such as black pepper and cinnamon. While this can be a characteristic of the grape varietal, many spicy notes are imparted from oak influences.

Undertone - The more subtle nuances, aromas and flavors of wine.

Unoaked - Also known as unwooded, refers to wines that have been matured without contact with wood/oak such as in aging barrels.

Zesty - A wine with noticeable acidity and usually citrus notes.

Zippy - A wine with noticeable acidity that is balanced with enough fruit structure so as to not taste overly acidic.

Ladies Guide on Wine Lingo #forurbanwomen

ON SERVING WINE

At home the host assumes the duty of wine waiter. All the wine should be opened in advance – It’s more convenient anyway – and the wines tasted to make sure they’re all right. Some people insist on opening wine way in advance of the meal, in order to let “it breathe.” It’s a charming idea, but has absolutely no scientific basis whatsoever.

There is a difference between breathing and decanting, which is useful for very young wines as well as older ones. Young red wines can benefit from exposure from oxygen, which they get from being poured with some vigour into a decanter, or even a pitcher; this can soften the tannin a bit. Older wines may be have some harmless but gritty sediment as a result of aging. To let the sediment fall to the bottom, the bottle should be stood upright for at least a day, then opened and carefully poured into a decanter until sediments starts to show in the flow. The ounce or so of wine that’s left in the bottle is discarded. This should be done right before the meal, so the wine will taste its best – old wines can fade after a shirt time.

The usual sequence of wine service for a meal of several courses is generally based on intensity of flavour and character, as well as the occasion. Depending on the accompanying food, it is white wine before red, young before old, light before heavy, dry before sweet, and minor before fine or rare.

Ladies Guide on Wine Lingo #forurbanwomen

Why do you drink wine? What made you have an interest to learn more about wine?


xoxo, Blair



93 LOVES AND COMMENTS:

  1. Who doesn't love wine. I'm a wine lover too!

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    1. I would so surprised if I will meet a French who hates wine.

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  2. I don't drink wine, or any alcohol at all. But these terminologies are good for me. At least I have some knowledge when people talk to me about wines.

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    1. Exactly! But you are missing the wine experience. Hope you can indulge in a little wine sipping so you would understand wholeheartedly why they use these words for a particular wine :D

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  3. I'm not a wine drinker, but I'm sure this is a great list for those who are. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thank you for visiting Tammy.
      Just like Emily, it is also nice to know some words for conversational use only, especially if you don't drink.

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  4. Great post! I love wine but I really don't know anything about it, its quite embarrassing. If I go out and I want a glass of wine I just say "can I have a glass of red wine that's not yuck and dry" ha ha ha

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    1. LOL I love your honesty and it gives the server the exact wine you want. That's cool.

      Actually in learning about wine, these words are just our guide, but it doesn't limits to words. Sometimes we describe the exact taste through mentioning the experience and story, and there is nothing wrong with it.

      You can say that "I want wine that taste like a kiss of midnight in Florence." The sommelier knows and understand what you mean.

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  5. Oh wow I thought I knew a bit about wine but clearly I need to brush up even more, never knew there was this much.

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    1. Constant reading and sipping wine will help you to increase your wine lingo :D

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  6. Was in Bordeaux couple of weeks ago... so much wine too little time :(... i am not so into the wine science... but this article is really nice written!

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    1. Thank you dear! Hope you enjoyed at least one kind of Bordeaux.

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  7. This was very interesting. I've never known that much about drinking wines.

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    1. Thank you for visiting Christina. I am glad that you learn new words!

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  8. What a wonderful, user friendly guide for wine lovers. I like wine, but I am not familiar with the whole terminology, so thank you for this insight. How would you describe a white whine that is smooth, the oposite of oaky? not too bitter?

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  9. I'm starting to love wine after reading this! For me, I might love taste of earthy and zesty that's totally me! Love it!

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    1. That is wonderful. The good thing about wine is that you can create your own definition according to your style. These words are just guides, but you can describe your favorite wine on your own way and experience.

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  10. This is a great guide! quite a few terms I didn't know. My dad is big on wine so i still knew some bits!

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    1. That is cool! I started learning about wine with my Dad as well :D

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  11. Very comprehensive guide to wine tasting! I was familiar with most of the terms but there were a few I don't think I've ever encountered. Thank you!

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    1. Gladly you appreciate this guide :D Thank you Kyla!

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  12. great addition for my vocabulary! great post, I have learned things about wine especially those words, they're all new to me.

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    1. Oh I am so glad that you learned some words!

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  13. I love ALL things wine:) I need to try the brands you suggested, I always love your photos! Great post

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  14. I know just about nothing about wine! I like the sweet ones, but that's about it. So, this was the perfect post for me to learn more. :D Thanks!

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    1. I've been there from zero knowledge and now learning some of these words through constant reading and research plus tasting various wine.

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  15. I'm familiar with many of these terms but a few are new to me. Cool!

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  16. I won't lie, I'm not a wine drinker. I think it stems from the fact that I've only ever taste cheap wine. I never knew there were so many words used to describe wine. thanks for sharing.

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    1. Don't worry coz you can always learn about wine :D

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  17. Wow! I feel like I learned so much. I’m not much of a wine drinker, when out to eat, mainly because I had no clue what all these terms meant on the menu! Thanks so much for the education!😘

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  18. I do not drink, but these are great tips and tips for those that do. Well descirbed too

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  19. I couldn't agree more, wine should not be saved for special occassions, just indulge in a little glass whenever you are in the mood for it! I love red at winter, full bodied and heart warming! Lovely, very informative post Blair!

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    1. Thank you Dear!
      It would be shame to let wine stay inside your wine cabinet and not touching it. Drink it because you deserve its quality.

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  20. I can certainly use a guide. I hear these words and just nod, but not from now on.

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    1. High five on that. I'm glad this post helps you :)

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  21. sounds like you are a genious when it comes to wine thanks for sharing your wisdom
    come see me at http://shopannies.blogspot.com

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    1. Hello Angie,

      I'm not a genius dear :) Am still learning these words and I hope that you ladies will learn as well.

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  22. I love the wine terms. I like the Austere most. I could use that for a baby name.

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  23. This is such a fab article! Wine lingo can be a tricky business and it is great that you have spent time creating this little glossary of wine terms :) x

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  24. This is great information! I need to keep this list handy for my next wine adventure.

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  25. I am planning a wine-tasting experience but I never thought of having such a big choice of wine! That's so exciting :-)

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  26. I love this! I've gone on at least 2 wine tasting tours but didn't really pay attention to what they were saying. I came for the wine lol. It's nice to have this as reference.

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    1. Hahaha I was like that before, and yeah I focus on enjoying the wine and not the wine terminologies :D

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  27. I thought I knew my wine lingo but it turns out that I was wrong! I knew about cassis and body but I had no idea that legs was a lingo term for wine as well. I have always wanted to go for wine tasting, the closest to that is when I went to a seven course vegetarian meal and we had 'wine pairings which were delicious !

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    1. Oh that's wonderful Ana!
      This coming week I have a schedule wine tasting event with my friends and I hope it will be another fantastic nice for me :D

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  28. This is such a great post. And you are right, everyone loves wine and it's actually good for you. Thank you for sharing.

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  29. I am a non alcoholic and I had no idea about these things... This is soo informative :D

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    1. Drinking wine doesn't a person is alcoholic. You'll become alcoholic is you use it abused it.

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  30. Oh, I never knew that there is so much of lingo around the wine, Since I don't drink so I'm as such not aware . But reading it seemed interesting.

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    1. Yeah it is. These are just a few words I know, and there are others :D

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  31. Personally do not drink, but interesting post!

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  32. These are great tips and vocabulary to know! I'm a huge wine lover and the lingo can be tricky since there's so many adjectives used to describe wine!

    Sondra xx
    prettyfitfoodie.com

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    1. I agree. And you can also describe your favorite wine according to your story and experiences.

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  33. I like wine...Especially rosé. I have a little ritual when I go home after a long day....

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    1. Oh that's wonderful! Glad you enjoyed it :D

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  34. I am not a big wine drinker but I would love to know more about it! Thats a really helpful blogpost :)

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  35. Wow! I learnt some new terms over here. Not a wine drinker but had fun looking at the photos :D

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    1. Yeah, I was like you before just learning the words and ideas but haven't experienced the taste. And when I finally had, omg it completes my learnings.

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  36. Enjoyed reading your wine guide! I personally love a glass of good and deep read wine in the evening, it's such a relaxing and charming drink!

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    1. Me too! And even spending it with my warm bubble bath (especially when Amore is not around).

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  37. That opening photo is just stunning. I love how detailed this guide is. Very, very useful.

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  38. I am not much into alcohol but when I drink I pick only wine. That ways I can call myself a wine lover but I know very little about it. Your post helped me know a few new things about wine. Thanks for sharing.
    Do drop by my blog as well : http://styleovercoffee.com :)

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    1. That's awesome that you also like wine. Yeah we have our own taste and wine personality, and that's awesome!

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  39. What an awesome description here. Wine really I think, today I got to know all about it. Very nicely done.

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  40. This is an excellent guide. Very detailed and great for the beginning wine lover.

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  41. Oh wow, this is very eye opening for me. I like to think of myself as a wine drinker, but apparently I have a lot to learn as this was my first time hearing of a lot of the lingo.

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    1. Keep on learning and enjoying your wine. :D

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  42. Those are definitely wine terms that I have heard. But they don't make enough sense unless you know what they mean to you individually. Catching the tones or tannens of the drink is so important and knowing how to distinguish.

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    1. What is your favorite wine and from which vineyard?

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    2. I like this dessert wine, that was originally a sacramental wine during prohibition in the United States from the Beaulieu Vineyard in Napa Valley. That is probably my favorite.

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    3. That's fantastic!

      Aside from my interest to wine, I also collect interest wine bottles with great stories :D

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  43. I shared your post with my hubby...he loved it. He's such a wine guy. I like really sweet wine.

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    1. Oh I like sweet wine as well! And pairing it with dark chocolate :D

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  44. And I've always wanted to know.. at least, something. Such a helpful guide, and it is written very nice!

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  45. I am loving all these wine lingos! And I love me some wine, especially during the winter months. I just light a candle get a blanket and watch a movie with my husband.

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  46. You are killing me with this blog! lol. I recently warmed up to wine and then got pregnant right after so i've been dying for a glass and plan on bringing some to the hospital with me haha.

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  47. I am a wine lover too! My favorite is Rose and this is a perfect guide for a wine lover too. I have never been to a vineyard but I would love to experience it someday.

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