NAIDOC Week: Australia's Key Cities and their Traditional Place Names

a bird's eye view photo of Gold Coast Queensland
Everyday is another learning opportunity and experience for me here in Australia. Aside from learning the Aussie ways of life, it is also a chance to find myself in this big island. 

Visiting many lovely places, and learning from its own history and genuine stories, including the first nation’s many stories, and it is a very exciting experience!

Just like the Philippines, did you know that Australia's First Peoples have been living on the Australian continent for millennia.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia is made up of many different and distinct groups, each with their own culture, customs, language and laws. They are the world’s oldest surviving culture; cultures that continue to be expressed in dynamic and contemporary ways.

There are a lot of things to learn, and as a new resident of this country, I felt the responsibility to learn their stories that makes Australia’s past, understand the present, and help to bring a good future. 

We will tackle this conversation one at the time, right here in my blog. 




In celebration of NAIDOC Week, here are the Australia’s main cities and their traditional place names:

a picture of a thermal spring in Darwin, Northern Territory
Mataranka Thermal Springs in Darwin, Northern Territory. Darwin is called Garramilla(guh-ruh-mil-lah) in its Traditional name.


a bird's eye view of Buccaneer Achipelago in Western Australia
When you visit Broome in Western Australia, never miss the opportunity to visit the stunning Buccaneer Archipelago, the Precambrian sandstone islands with over two billion years old. Broome is called Rubibi (roo-bee-bee) in its Traditional name.





a picture of Walpa Gorge in Northern Territory
This is Walpa Gorge at Kata Tjuta in Alice Springs or Mparntwe (mm-bahn-doo-uh), Northern Territory.


a bird's eye view of Geraldton coast in Western Australia
A gorgeous view of Geraldton in Western Australia. Geraldton is called Jambinu (jum-bin-oo) in its Traditional name





a picture of Hamelin Bay in Perth
Hamelin Bay located in Perth Western Australia. Perth is called Boorloo (boo-r-loo) in its Traditional name.


a picture of famous landmark park in Adelaide
Adelaide is called Tarndanya (tarn-dan-yuh) in its Traditional name.


a picture of building and main street in Melbourne
Melbourne is called Naarm (nahh-m) in Aborigine name.





a picture of Hobart Harbour, with boats
Is the Hobart, called Nipaluna (nip-uh-loo-nuh) in Traditional name so beautiful? Add this to your travel itinerary!


a picture of a mountain, a tower, and a rainbow
When you see this tower outside your airplane window, you know that you are in Canberra, aka. ACT the capital of Australia. Canberra is called Ngambri / Ngunnawal (nam-bree / noon-a-waal) in Aborigine name.


a picture of Sydney Opera in the harbour
The gorgeous view of the Sydney Harbour. Sydney is called Warrang (wuhr-ung) in Aborigine name.





a bird's eye view photo of Gold Coast Queensland
Gold Coast is called Yugambeh (yoog-umm-beh) in Aborigine name.


a picture of the famous Brisbane landmark with buildings on the background
Brisbane is called Meanjih (mee-an-jun) in Aborigine name


a picture of a woman on the top of the hill, overlooking the coastline
Overlooking the gorgeous view of Cairns’ coastline. Cairns is called Gimuy (gim-oii) in Aborigine name.






a picture of a landmark mountain in Sunshine Coast
The majestic beauty of Mount Ngunngun in Sunshine Coast in Queensland. Sunshine Coast is called Kabi Kabi (kah-bee kah-bee) in its traditional name. 


I also found a video teaching us on how to pronounce these traditional places 



a picture of a woman in white dress, standing in front of the gallery building
Hope the next time you visit Australia you can now identify its traditional names and never forget to pay respect for its traditional people.



Acknowledgment of the Country
We acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the Country throughout Australia and recognize their continuing connection to land, waters, and culture. We pay our respects to Elders past, present, and emerging and ask that during your travels you respect these cultures, peoples, and land.
















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20 comments :

  1. Brisbane is just a stone's throw away from some of Australia's most beautiful beaches and is home to iconic wildlife, picturesque parks, amazing art galleries and so much more! oof i want to go back!

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    1. Yeah that's true! I am considering moving to Queensland for a better lifestyle!

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  2. It's good to know that since you have settled in Australia, you have this continuing desire to learn more about the place and its origins. We appreciate a place more if we study its history and traditions. We value more its people. We pay respect to its ancestral heritage.Thanks, I learned more about the traditional names of AU's main cities. And the photos... They are superb. ♥️

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    1. Many local Australians, even established immigrants doesn't know much about the First Nations because for many years, it wasn't given focus on everyday conversation, even at school curriculum. Only in recent years that the government starting to reconcile and make peace with the traditional nation. It will be a long journey, but I have high hopes that Australia will get there.

      Respect begets respect.

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  3. If there's one thing I love about Australia, it's their effort to preserve the original aboriginal names of the places. Thanks for the tour, by the way!

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    1. That is because the new generation of First Nations are working so hard to preserve it and keeps on fighting for their rights and their nation. I would love to learn more!

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  4. I lost a trip to Victoria in September last year because of the pandemic. Maybe I would've visited Nepaluna then if my boss would take me.

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    1. Yeah, hopefully next year the international travel will be back to normal.

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  5. I never been to Australia but my sister and my mom's family are all living there. How I wish I could visit the country and explore. Australia is really a country rich of natural resources, culture, history and very diverse. I am so glad that you're able to feature an short overview of the cities and it's origin to your readersa

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  6. Been to goldcoast once, and it's nice to learn something new with this. I am so explaining and showing this article to my nephew who's living in Yugambeh when we (hopefully) get back. Where did you get the info though? I wanna learn more! :D

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    1. That's amazing! I've been keeping tabs on many local news network, and Australian official website, including the NAIDOC website. It helps me to understand the beginnings of Australia which were almost extinct. I think every Australians, including immigrants in Australia must know about First Nations.

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  7. I can still recall the first time I came across the word "Australia" when I was little. I thought it was only ice and snow. Haha! Looking at this photo-tour just makes me excited of all the stories I am to discover when I travel someday. :)

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    1. Australia got more ice and snow than Iceland, or any Alpine region in Europe.

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  8. first of all the photos are so beautifully taken! i've never been to australia, but i've always wanted to visit, well, when i already have family and friends there,t hats when istarted to want to visit the country. these are places i didnt even know (well some,) and im happy to have seen it here in your blog. thank you for sharing them!

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  9. Thanks for the virtual tour. But more than pleasing my eyes, I like that this is so informative because I get to know the aborigine names of the places. The country has equally rich culture like our place.

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    1. Exactly! That is why I understand how much important to know these things and respect the traditional owners.

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  10. Wow! Australia is such a nice place. It's so clean and the tower reminds me of Seoul Tower here in Seoul. Do I need to apply for visa if I visit Australia? I'm holding a Korean passport.

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    1. Yeah, I reckon you need to apply for a tourist visa. But do it two year from now coz international travel is still not possible.

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